STAMI News

  • SMI Researcher Bhamla to study One of the World’s Fastest Creatures

    Soft Matter Incubator (SMI) member Saad Bhamla (School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering) has received a four-year National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study Spirostomum ambiguum, a tiny single-celled protozoan that achieves blazing-fast acceleration while contracting its worm-like body. The physics and mathematics of the movement could help advance nanotechnology and accelerate a new generation of robots barely large enough to see with the naked eye. Read more in Research Horizons.

  • Material Formed from Crab Shells and Trees Could Replace Flexible Plastic Packaging

    New materials developed in the labs of GTPN, CRĀSI, and SMI member Carson Meredith derived from crab shells and tree fibers has the potential to replace the flexible plastic packaging used to keep food fresh. GTPN, CRĀSI, and SMI members John Reynolds and Meisha Shofner were also part of the team.

    The new material is described in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering. See the Article in Research Horizons.

  • STAMI-COPE Professors receive DURIP Grant for Advanced Solar Cell Fabrication Equipment

    COPE, GTPN, and CRĀSI Professors Seth Marder, Zhiqun Lin, Natalie Stingelin, and Carlos Silva from the Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Sciences and Engineering have received a Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) grant for equipment to establish a unique deposition and characterization station for a wide range of metal-halide perovskite materials that will allow control, with high precision, of thin-film deposition from solution in a controlled atmosphere, and enable characterization of the produced films during film formation as well as in device assemblies.

  • GTPN Student Polymer Network Members Shine at Polymer Conference

    The 2018 National Graduate Research Polymer Conference (NGRPC18) recognized three STAMI Ph.D. students for outstanding presentations: Aditi Khirbat – top oral presentation; Brian Schmatz – runner-up oral presentation; Young Jun Yoon – top poster presentation. Congratulations Aditi, Brian, and Young Jun!

  • STAMI Director Seth Marder receives Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor Award

    The award recognizes outstanding achievement in teaching, research, and service. Instituted in 1984 by the Class of 1934 in observance of its 50th reunion, the award is presented to a professor who has made significant long-term contributions — contributions that have brought widespread recognition to the professor, to his or her school, and to the Institute.

  • Materials Developed in the labs of STAMI Professor John Reynolds may power Transparent Wood Smart Windows

    Transparent wood composites have high strength, toughness, thermal insulation, and excellent transmissivity, and offer a route to replace glass for diffusely transmitting windows. STAMI-GTPN and -COPE Professor John Reynolds' group has used conjugated-polymer-based electrochromic materials and transparent wood to create devices that switch on-demand. The devices exhibit a vibrant magenta-to-clear color change that results from a remarkably colorless bleached state. Published in Chemistry and Sustainability (ChemSusChem)

  • Nanostructured Gate Dielectric Boosts Stability of Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    A nanostructured gate dielectric developed in the labs of STAMI-COPE Professor Bernard Kippelen may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and simultaneously protects the organic semiconductor – which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient environment – and enables the transistors to operate with unprecedented stability.

    For more see the Article in Georgia Tech Research Horizons

  • Perking Up and Crimping the ‘Bristles’ of Polyelectrolyte Brushes

    The labs of STAMI member Blair Brettmann (GTPN, SMI, School of Materials Science and Engineering) have created a molecular-sized brush that looks like a shoe brush and has properties with great potential for the materials industry and medicine, but polyelectrolyte brushes can be sensitive, and getting them to work correctly is tricky. New research shows what can make them break down, but also what can get them to systematically recover.

    See the Article on Georgia Tech Research Horizons.