Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfaces

The Center for the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfaces (STAMI) supports the activities of researchers across Georgia Tech to create the next generations of functional materials and interfaces.

STAMI Community

Latest News

  • STAMI-COPE Professor Shannon Yee Developing Thermoelectric Polymers for Personal Climate Control

    STAMI-COPE Professor Shannon Yee and his team of Georgia Tech researchers are developing polymer-based thermoelectric (TE) materials for wearable devices to help people feel warmer or cooler on demand. The polymer TE materials could either harvest body heat to generate electricity or be used to produce a cooling sensation by hooking up a flexible battery to the circuitry.

  • Metal Oxide-infused Membranes Could Offer Low-Energy Alternative For Chemical Separations

    CRĀSI member Prof. Mark Losego and GTPN member Prof. Ryan Lively are working on membranes that could separate chemicals without using energy-intensive distillation processes in a wide variety of products including gasoline, plastics, and food. The latest work, published in Chemistry of Materials and sponsored by the Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation, outlined a process for taking a polymer-based membrane and infusing it with a metal oxide network. The resulting membrane is far more effective at standing up to harsh chemicals without degrading.

  • Electrochromic Polymers Advanced in the Lab of GTPN and COPE Professor John Reynolds

    A serendipitous discovery by Graduate Student Dylan Christiansen led to polymers that quickly change color from completely clear to a range of vibrant hues — and back again. The work could have applications in everything from skyscraper windows that control the amount of light and heat coming in and out of a building, to switchable camouflage and visors for military applications, and even color-changing cosmetics and clothing. It also helps fill a knowledge gap in a key area of materials science and chemistry.

  • Safer Electrochromic Inks Developed in STAMI-GTPN Professor Reynolds's Lab

    Electrochromic films synthesized in the labs of STAMI-GTPN and STAMI-COPE Professor John Reynolds change their colors with the flick of a switch. Now they can be applied more safely thanks to an innovative chemical process that makes them water soluble. They can be sprayed and printed, instead of being confined behind safety implements to handle volatile and toxic fumes. 

  • STAMI Students Ditullio and Tremblay Win School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Safety Awards

    STAMI Graduate Students Brandon Ditullio and Marie-Helene Tremblay recently received the 2019 William Emerson Safety Awards for impactful contributions to the safety culture in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Winners are nominated by members of their research groups and members of the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Thanks and Congratulations Brandon and Marie-Helene!