Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfaces

The Center for the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfaces (STAMI) supports the activities of researchers across Georgia Tech to create the next generations of functional materials and interfaces.

STAMI Community

Latest News

1/30/2017

Soft Matter Incubator (SMI) researchers have created water-filled particles known as microgels within robust polymer networks made of natural fibrin. In a remarkably dynamic process, the microgels self-assemble into three-dimensional tunnel-like structures that could allow repair cells to migrate through the polymer network to begin the healing process.

12/12/2016

A simple solution-based electrical doping technique could help reduce the cost of polymer solar cells and organic electronic devices, potentially expanding the applications for these technologies. By enabling production of efficient single-layer solar cells, the new process could help move organic photovoltaics into a new generation of wearable devices and enable small-scale distributed power generation.

1/3/2017

STAMI has awarded 2017 Seed Grants to Georgia Tech researchers that are members of the Community for Research on Active Surfaces and Interfaces (CRĀSI) and the Soft Matter Incubator (SMI). Proposals were selected on a competitive basis. The 2017 CRĀSI seed grant program sought innovative proposals addressing fundamental scientific questions pertaining to surfaces and interfaces, and two collaborative proposals were selected. The 2017 SMI seed grant program sought proposals addressing questions pertaining to fundamental soft matter, and three collaborative proposals were selected. Learn more.

Events

Friday, February 10, 2017 - 4:00pm
Ionic Liquid/Block Polymer Nanocomposites: Remarkably Versatile, Functional Materials
Prof. Timothy P. Lodge
University of Minnesota

Ionic liquids are an emerging class of solvents with an appealing set of physical attributes. These include negligible vapor pressure, impressive chemical and thermal stability, tunable solvation properties, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. In particular, the non-volatility renders ionic liquids practical components of devices, but they require structure-directing agents to become functional materials. Block polymers provide a convenient platform for achieving desirable nanostructures by self-assembly, with lengthscales varying from a few nanometers up to several hundred nanometers. Furthermore, ionic liquids and polymer blocks can be selected to impart exquisitely tunable thermosensitivity, by exploiting either upper or lower critical solution transitions (UCSTs and LCSTs).

Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 3:00pm
Freezing on a Sphere
Professor Paul Chaikin
Julius Silver Professor of Physics at New York University

Melting in two dimensions is characterized by the thermal excitation and proliferation of free topological defects, disclinations and dislocations which destroy the rigidity of the crystal. This freezing/melting process has been well established for flat systems, but on a sphere, topology requires that there must be a net 12 pentagons (1/2 disclinations) i.e., the 12 pentagons on a soccer ball, and energetically it is favorable to screen the pentagons with strings of dislocations (pentagon-heptagon pairs) known as “scars”. We find that freezing on sphere proceeds by the formation of a single, encompassing, crystalline “continent” that forces the defects into 12 isolated “seas” with icosahedral symmetry.