STAMI News

Monday, March 27, 2017

Soft Matter Incubator (SMI) researcher Prof. Elisabetta Matsumoto is part of a team of researchers that is helping bring hyperbolic space to anyone with a virtual reality (VR) headset. The effort is designed to allow users to experience non-Euclidean spaces in which parallel lines diverge (hyperbolic space) that can be difficult to fully imagine with purely mathematical considerations. The research was recently part of the News in Focus in Nature. Find out more here.

Monday, January 30, 2017

From: The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, 2017. Publication link.

Soft Matter Incubator (SMI) researchers have created water-filled particles known as microgels within robust polymer networks made of natural fibrin. In a remarkably dynamic process, the microgels self-assemble into three-dimensional tunnel-like structures that could allow repair cells to migrate through the polymer network to begin the healing process.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

STAMI has awarded 2017 Seed Grants to Georgia Tech researchers that are members of the Community for Research on Active Surfaces and Interfaces (CRĀSI) and the Soft Matter Incubator (SMI). Proposals were selected on a competitive basis. The 2017 CRĀSI seed grant program sought innovative proposals addressing fundamental scientific questions pertaining to surfaces and interfaces, and two collaborative proposals were selected. The 2017 SMI seed grant program sought proposals addressing questions pertaining to fundamental soft matter, and three collaborative proposals were selected. Learn more.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

From: The National Academy of Inventors

Professor Seth Marder, from the Georgia Tech Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Science and Engineering, has been elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). According to the NAI, "Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society." Professor Marder is the first NAI fellow from the Georgia Tech College of Sciences. Read more here.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Pentamethyl rhodacene and a section of a single wall carbon nanotube.

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were n-doped in thin-film transistors with a solution-processed pentamethylrhodocene dimer. The charge transport properties of organorhodium-treated SWCNT thin films show consistent n-type behavior when characterized in both Hall effect and thin-film transistor geometries.

Monday, December 12, 2016

The surface orientation of perylene diimide (PDI) surface modifiers can be changed based on the deposition technique.

Modification of the TCO surface with a redox-active surface modifier is a possible approach toward enhancing OPV efficiency by providing an efficient charge-transfer pathway between either hole- or electron-harvesting contacts and the organic active layer. Two different deposition techniques were used with perylene diimide (PDI) surface modifiers in the study: adsorption from solution (SA) and spin coating (SC), to create three types of monolayer films on ITO: SA PDI–phenyl–PA, SA PDI–diphenyl–PA, and SC PDI–phenyl–PA. These thin films, designed to act as “charge-transfer mediators”, were used to study relationships between molecular structure, electron-transfer (ET) kinetics, and electronic structure.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Graduate students Felipe Larrain and Wen-Fang Chou testing the performance of the single layer solar cells developed at Georgia Tech using a new electrical doping technique. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

A simple solution-based electrical doping technique could help reduce the cost of polymer solar cells and organic electronic devices, potentially expanding the applications for these technologies. By enabling production of efficient single-layer solar cells, the new process could help move organic photovoltaics into a new generation of wearable devices and enable small-scale distributed power generation.