Past and Future Distinguished Lectures

Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 2:30pm
Dr. Christopher Jarzynski
University of Maryland
Location: Mathematics and Science Center E300
Abstract:

The Jarzynski research group focuses on statistical mechanics and thermodynamics at the molecular level, with a particular focus on the foundations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. They have worked on topics that include the application of statistical mechanics to problems of biophysical interest; the analysis of artificial molecular machines; the development of efficient numerical schemes for estimating thermodynamic properties of complex systems; the relationship between thermodynamics and information processing; quantum and classical shortcuts to adiabaticity; and quantum thermodynamics.

Event Contact: Jennifer Curtis (jennifer.curtis@physics.gatech.edu) or Mike Filler (mfiller@gatech.edu)
Friday, September 22, 2017 - 3:00pm
Wigner Lattices and Born Melting
Prof. David Weitz
Harvard University
Location: MoSE G011
Abstract:

Wigner lattices are nearly defect-free, and they are formed through repulsive interactions exclusively. The absence of defects inhibits melting, making the crystal much more stable, and it reduces the energy difference between crystal and liquid. Thus, the melting transition acquires a distinct second-order character, even though it is strictly a first-order transition. This form of melting was first proposed by the German physicist Max Born nearly 80 years ago. It is only now that its study can be carried out. Reception to follow the Lecture

Event Contact: alberto.fernandez@physics.gatech.edu
Friday, February 10, 2017 - 4:00pm
Ionic Liquid/Block Polymer Nanocomposites: Remarkably Versatile, Functional Materials
Prof. Timothy P. Lodge
University of Minnesota
Location: Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB) Seminar Room 1005
Abstract:

Ionic liquids are an emerging class of solvents with an appealing set of physical attributes. These include negligible vapor pressure, impressive chemical and thermal stability, tunable solvation properties, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. In particular, the non-volatility renders ionic liquids practical components of devices, but they require structure-directing agents to become functional materials. Block polymers provide a convenient platform for achieving desirable nanostructures by self-assembly, with lengthscales varying from a few nanometers up to several hundred nanometers. Furthermore, ionic liquids and polymer blocks can be selected to impart exquisitely tunable thermosensitivity, by exploiting either upper or lower critical solution transitions (UCSTs and LCSTs).

Event Contact: sharon.lawrence@chemistry.gatech.edu
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 3:00pm
Freezing on a Sphere
Professor Paul Chaikin
Julius Silver Professor of Physics at New York University
Location: Molecular Science and Engineering Building, Auditorium G011
Abstract:

Melting in two dimensions is characterized by the thermal excitation and proliferation of free topological defects, disclinations and dislocations which destroy the rigidity of the crystal. This freezing/melting process has been well established for flat systems, but on a sphere, topology requires that there must be a net 12 pentagons (1/2 disclinations) i.e., the 12 pentagons on a soccer ball, and energetically it is favorable to screen the pentagons with strings of dislocations (pentagon-heptagon pairs) known as “scars”. We find that freezing on sphere proceeds by the formation of a single, encompassing, crystalline “continent” that forces the defects into 12 isolated “seas” with icosahedral symmetry.

Event Contact: Sharon Lawrence (sharon.lawrence@ece.gatech.edu)
Monday, November 7, 2016 - 11:30am
Professor Eric Baer
Case Western Reserve University
Location: Variable, see Details
Abstract:

A series of lectures in modern nanostructural polymer science and it's applications. Please note the dates and times of the individual lectures: Lecture 1: November 7, 12:00 PMLayered and Fibrillar  Polymeric Systems by NanoExtrusion - Forced Assembly”; Lecture 2: November 8, 1:30 PMNew Polymeric NanoSystems - Lessons from Nature and Hierarchical Structures”; and Lecture 3: November 9, 3:00 PMApplications for New Nanolayered Composites and Membrane Filters”.

Event Contact: Sharon Lawrence (sharon.lawrence@ece.gatech.edu)

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