Simple Processing Technique Could Cut Cost of Organic PV and Wearable Electronics

Graduate students Felipe Larrain and Wen-Fang Chou testing the performance of the single layer solar cells developed at Georgia Tech using a new electrical doping technique. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

Developed by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and colleagues from three other institutions, the technique provides a new way of inducing p-type electrical doping in organic semiconductor films. The process involves briefly immersing the films in a solution at room temperature, and would replace a more complex technique that requires vacuum processing.

“Our hope is that this will be a game-changer for organic photovoltaics by further simplifying the process for fabricating polymer-based solar cells,” said Bernard Kippelen, director of Georgia Tech’s Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics and a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “We believe this technique is likely to impact many other device platforms in areas such as organic printed electronics, sensors, photodetectors and light-emitting diodes.”

Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the work was reported December 5 in the journal Nature Materials. The research also involved scientists from the University of California at Santa Barbara, Kyushu University in Japan, and the Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands.

Additional Infohttp://www.news.gatech.edu/2016/12/05/simple-processing-technique-could-cut-cost-organic-pv-and-wearable-electronics